Friends of Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge
 

What's happening at the Refuge?

The Refuge and the Friends are always busy, managing wildlife and introducing the public to the wildlife and nature. The blog "What's happening at the refuge" will keep you up to date with what's going on.
  • 16 Sep 2012 1:40 PM | Joe Zebrowski (Administrator)

    The National Wildlife Refuge Association is excited to announce the 2012 Refuge System Photo Contest is now open and accepting entries through October 12, 2012, the end of National Wildlife Refuge Week. This year Southwest Airlines, the official airlines of NWRA, has generously donated the grand prize of $2,000 and 4 round trip tickets. Other prizes include generous offerings from Eagle Optics, Orvis, Wild Bird Centers, and NatureShare.

    Each year we receive outstanding images that showcase the natural beauty and wonder of our wildlife refuges.

    Wouldn't it be great to see our own Las Vegas NWR or Maxwell NWR featured?

    For more information and contest details please visit refugeassociation.org.
  • 12 Sep 2012 4:43 PM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Every year, the Concert for the Birds gets better and better. This year, the 8th annual event, will feature local musicians Carl Bernstein and Marilyn Priddy (below). Plus nature walks (check out the new wheelchair accessible Meadowlark Trail around the Refuge Headquarters), games, crafts, piñatas, a great silent auction, and free food.

    Check the Calendar of Events for times.


  • 30 Apr 2012 11:27 AM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Thanks to the FWS (Debbie Pike), the Friends have an eye-catching display for our appearances at events like the Synergy Fest, People's Faire, County Fair, and at businesses around town. It is an easily collapsible frame that holds six panels describing us and our activities.

    Here it is at the April 28 Synergy Fest:

    New Friends Display
  • 09 Mar 2012 4:17 PM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Come enjoy Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge and cast your fishing line in Lake 13.

    The fishing season on Lake 13 at Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge opened on March 1. Visitors who weathered the wind and snow were rewarded with fishing lines taut with hungry rainbow trout. Opening weekend brought in over 30 vehicles of anglers looking to catch the Big One. It was not unusual for an angler to land a 16-incher!

    Between March 1 and October 31 you are invited to try your luck; you might even catch a record! Lake 13 is the home of the state record for yellow perch caught in 1995. Anglers have also caught black bullhead, channel catfish, green sunfish, bluegill, walleye, and largemouth bass.

    New Mexico Department of Game and Fish stocked the lake with 2000 hatchery reared rainbow trout last October. So come out to Lake 13, throw in your line and enjoy your national wildlife refuge. There is no entrance, camping, or use fees charged at the refuge, but New Mexico State and U.S. Coast Guard regulations apply for fishing activities on Lake 13. Stop at the Lake 13 entrance kiosk for current regulations.

    _GoBackThe six mile network of gravel roads that crisscross the refuge are open, conditions permitting, 24 hours a day and seven days a week. You are invited to stop at the refuge visitor center which is open when staff is available, generally Monday through Friday 9 AM to 3:00 PM. The visitor center offers interpretive information and displays for children and adults, restrooms, a drinking fountain and the opportunity to ask questions of the refuge staff. When the visitor center is closed a welcome kiosk next to the driveway provides maps, bird checklists, and interpretive information to enhance your visit. Vault toilets are always open at the entrance road to Lake 13.


    Deer and birds are close by, so bring your binoculars to the lake.

    Driving Directions

    From Albuquerque, Santa Fe, or Las Vegas NM – Drive north on I-25 and take the Maxwell Exit (426). Drive north 0.8 miles on State Highway 445. At the intersection of State Highways 445 and 505, drive 2.5 miles west. Turn north on Lake 13 Road at the refuge entrance sign and drive 1.25 miles to the refuge visitor center. The distance from Albuquerque is 200 miles and the estimated driving time is 3 hours and 15 minutes.


    From Taos, NM – Drive east on NM-58 and travel through Cimarron to Interstate 25. Go north on I-25 and take the Maxwell Exit (426). Drive north 0.8 miles on State Highway 445. At the intersection of State Highways 445 and 505, drive 2.5 miles west. Turn north on Lake 13 Road at the refuge entrance sign and drive 1.25 miles to the refuge visitor center. The distance is 82 miles and the estimated driving time is 2 hours.


    From Cimarron, NM (Colfax County) – Drive east on NM-58 to Interstate 25. Go north on I-25 and take the Maxwell Exit (426). Drive north 0.8 miles on State Highway 445. At the intersection of State Highways 445 and 505, drive 2.5 miles west. Turn north on Lake 13 Road at the refuge entrance sign and drive 1.25 miles to the refuge visitor center. The distance is 30 miles and the estimated driving time is 39 minutes.

    (To avoid the Interstate, an alternate route from Cimarron would be to drive north on US-64 to the intersection of State Highway 505 and US-64. Turn east on to State Highway 505, and drive 10 miles. Turn north on Lake 13 Road at the refuge entrance sign and drive 1.25 miles to the refuge visitor
    center. The distance is 23 miles and the estimated driving time is 29 minutes.)


    Leann Wilkins, Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge Manager


  • 02 Mar 2012 9:20 AM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    The NMHU Conservation Club, Hermit's Peak Watershed Alliance, and the Friends of Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge sponsored a showing of the recent film, Green Fire, a remembrance of the conservationist Aldo Leopold, born 125 years ago. A good crowd, from a Cub Scout den to Highlands University students to senior citizens  filled Sininger Hall's theater on March 1. A highlight of the showing was a brief recollection of Leopold by Richard Bodner, who knew and worked with him in New Mexico. He described Leopold's "San Miguel County connection."

    Leopold immersed himself in nature as a young child in Burlington, IA, and became one of the first forest rangers in the USA as it discovered its own natural resources. As part of the movement to exterminate predators in the early 20th century, he experienced an epiphany when he saw the "green fire" leave the eyes of a dying wolf. He soon after realized the importance of predator to the health of the ecosystem, including the balance between predator and prey.

    Leopold's eloquent writing spurred the environmental movement behind the National Wildlife Refuges and eventually the reintroduction of wolves. Now Curt Meine's eloquent and beautifully photographed film brings Aldo Leopold back to life in our minds.


  • 28 Feb 2012 10:19 AM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Hello Birders!

    Yesterday, February 12th, 2012, I saw an adult male BARROW'S GOLDENEYE at
    Lake 13 at Maxwell NWR. It was about 1:30pm when I first spotted it. It
    was diving for food among a large group (~30 individuals) of Common
    Goldeneyes. I stayed watching it for well over an hour. I looked for a
    female, but there either wasn't a female there or I am not knowledgeable
    enough (yet) to be able to detect one.

    The most obvious field mark of the Barrow's Goldeneye was the mostly black
    back with clearly distinct white spots on the wings. This set the Barrow's
    apart from the Commons so much so that I was even able to find the
    Barrow's when it had its head concealed by an odd angle or tucked into its
    back feathers. The white cheek patch, when it was visible, was
    dramatically different from the Commons' swimming around it. Also the back
    of the head was significantly more elongated and sloped than the
    relatively narrow and vertical back of the head of the Commons.

    Pictures of the Barrow's Goldeneye adjacent to Common Goldeneyes (for
    helpful comparisons) can be found on my Flickr account, which can be
    accessed through my blog at www.newmexicobigyear2012.wordpress.com.

    Happy birding,

    Collin Adams
  • 15 Feb 2012 10:46 AM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Another Wild Read is A Great Aridness, by William deBuys, talks about climate change with a clarity and style that has been (fairly) compared to John McPhee. He delves into the incredible complexities of the atmosphere and sea to try to understand what is happening to the American Southwestern climate. He goes far beyond carbon footprints and melting ice to help us understand the dryer and warmer climate that may be our near future and how to prepare ourselves for it.

    Tome on the Range is holding a discussion session on the book at 2 PM on Sunday, February 26, unfortunatley overlapping with the Refuge talk on insects.

    Jo Rita Jordan
  • 22 Jan 2012 4:25 PM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
  • 22 Dec 2011 4:29 PM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Now that the waterfowl have gone south, it's almost time for the Great Backyard Bird Count.

    The 2012 GBBC will take place Friday, February 17, through Monday, February 20. Please join us for the 15th annual count!


    The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are across the continent. Anyone can participate, from beginning bird watchers to experts. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds.


    Download the poster for the GBBC here.

  • 06 Dec 2011 2:38 PM | Jo Rita Jordan (Administrator)
    Judges for the Electric Light Parade awarded First Place to our float! They thought it was a "beautiful float" and commented on the lighting of the float, the interaction with the crowd with our animals and said that it was" a complete story keeping with the central theme." Go to the Photo Album and see what you think.

    Jo Rita Jordan


Friends of Las Vegas (New Mexico) National Wildlife Refuge

FLVNWR@gmail.com

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